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Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2016 Jun;41(2):225-49. doi: 10.1007/s10484-015-9318-5.

Slow Cortical Potential Neurofeedback in Chronic Tinnitus Therapy: A Case Report.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Audiology, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17 Str., Kajetany, 05-830, Nadarzyn, Poland. r.milner@ifps.org.pl.
2
Bioimaging Research Center, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17 Str., Kajetany, 05-830, Nadarzyn, Poland.
3
Department of Experimental Audiology, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17 Str., Kajetany, 05-830, Nadarzyn, Poland.
4
Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17 Str., Kajetany, 05-830, Nadarzyn, Poland.
5
World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17 Str., Kajetany, 05-830, Nadarzyn, Poland.

Abstract

This study is the first to demonstrate outcomes of slow cortical potential (SCP) Neurofeedback training in chronic tinnitus. A 50-year old male patient with tinnitus participated in three SCP training blocks, separated with 1-month breaks. After the training the patient reported decreased tinnitus loudness and pitch, as well as improved quality of daily life. A quantitative electroencephalography analysis revealed close to normal changes of resting state bioelectrical activity in cortical areas considered to be involved in tinnitus generation. The present case study indicates that SCP Neurofeedback training can be considered a promising method for tinnitus treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Quantitative electroencephalography; Slow cortical potential Neurofeedback; Tinnitus therapy

PMID:
26459345
PMCID:
PMC4856729
DOI:
10.1007/s10484-015-9318-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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