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Semin Immunopathol. 2016 May;38(3):385-96. doi: 10.1007/s00281-015-0528-y. Epub 2015 Oct 12.

TRP channel functions in the gastrointestinal tract.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Ross Research Building, Room 945, 720 Rutland Ave, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
2
Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Ross Research Building, Room 945, 720 Rutland Ave, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. syyu@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are predominantly distributed in both somatic and visceral sensory nervous systems and play a crucial role in sensory transduction. As the largest visceral organ system, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract frequently accommodates external inputs, which stimulate sensory nerves to initiate and coordinate sensory and motor functions in order to digest and absorb nutrients. Meanwhile, the sensory nerves in the GI tract are also able to detect potential tissue damage by responding to noxious irritants. This nocifensive function is mediated through specific ion channels and receptors expressed in a subpopulation of spinal and vagal afferent nerve called nociceptor. In the last 18 years, our understanding of TRP channel expression and function in GI sensory nervous system has been continuously improved. In this review, we focus on the expressions and functions of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 in primary extrinsic afferent nerves innervated in the esophagus, stomach, intestine, and colon and briefly discuss their potential roles in relevant GI disorders.

KEYWORDS:

DRG; TRPA1; TRPM8; TRPV1; afferent; colon; eosinophilic esophatitis; esophagus; gastroesophageal reflux disease; gastrointestinal tract; inflammation; intestine; irritable bowel syndrome; neuron; nociception; nociceptor; nodose; stomach; vagal; visceral hypersensitivity

PMID:
26459157
DOI:
10.1007/s00281-015-0528-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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