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Spinal Cord. 2016 Jun;54(6):483-9. doi: 10.1038/sc.2015.179. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

Psychological and socioeconomic status, complications and quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries after discharge from hospital in Bangladesh: a cohort study.

Author information

1
Centre for Rehabilitation of the Paralysed, Savar, Bangladesh.
2
John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Sydney Medical School/Northern, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Mixed retrospective-prospective cohort study.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine psychological and socioeconomic status, complications and quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) after discharge from a hospital in Bangladesh.

SETTING:

Bangladesh.

METHODS:

All patients admitted in 2011 with a recent SCI to a hospital in Bangladesh were identified. Patients were interviewed by telephone in 2014 using translated versions of the SF12, the SCI Secondary Conditions Scale, the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESDS) and the Participation Component of the WHODAS. Questions were also asked about employment, living and financial situation, and opportunities to get out of bed and out of the house. Data were stratified by ability to walk on discharge.

RESULTS:

A total of 350 people were discharged with a recent SCI in 2011. By 2014, 55 had died. Of those still living, 283 were interviewed (96% follow-up rate). At the time of interview, 47% of participants were employed. One-quarter (26%) of those who were wheelchair-dependent had a pressure ulcer. The mean (s.d.) scores for the Mental and Physical Component of the SF12 were 32.0 points (5.5) and 35.8 points (3.9), respectively. The median (interquartile range) scores for the SCI Secondary Conditions Scale, CESDS and WHODAS for those who were wheelchair-dependent were 15% (10 to 19), 11 points (9 to 18) and 26 points (23 to 26), respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Many people with SCI in Bangladesh are house-bound, unemployed, living in poverty and have pressure ulcers. They experience moderate rates of depression and report limited quality of life.

PMID:
26458967
DOI:
10.1038/sc.2015.179
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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