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World J Gastroenterol. 2015 Oct 7;21(37):10487-92. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v21.i37.10487.

Microbiome as mediator: Do systemic infections start in the gut?

Author information

1
Melissa Latorre, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Daniel E Freedberg, Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10023, United States.

Abstract

The intestinal microbiome is emerging as a crucial mediator between external insults and systemic infections. New research suggests that our intestinal microorganisms contribute to critical illness and the development of non-gastrointestinal infectious diseases. Common pathways include a loss of fecal intestinal bacterial diversity and a disproportionate increase in toxogenic bacterial species. Therapeutic interventions targeting the microbiome - primarily probiotics - have yielded limited results to date. However, knowledge in this area is rapidly expanding and microbiome-based therapy such as short-chain fatty acids may eventually become a standard strategy for preventing systemic infections in the context of critical illness.

KEYWORDS:

Clostridium difficile; Critical illness; Gut; Microbiome; Probiotics; Short-chain fatty acids

PMID:
26457009
PMCID:
PMC4588071
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v21.i37.10487
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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