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Sci Rep. 2015 Oct 12;5:14943. doi: 10.1038/srep14943.

Migraine and possible etiologic heterogeneity for hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer.

Author information

1
Biostatistics &Computational Biology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park NC.
2
Epidemiology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park.
3
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

Migraine headache is often timed with the menstrual cycle. Some studies have reported reduced risk of breast cancer in migraineurs but most of those did not distinguish menstrually-related from non-menstrually-related migraine. To examine the possible associations between breast cancer and migraine overall and between cancer subcategories and the two migraine subtypes, we used a cohort study of 50,884 women whose sister had breast cancer and a sister-matched case-control study including 1,418 young-onset (<50 years) breast cancer cases. We analyzed the two studies individually and also in tandem via a hybrid Cox model, examining subcategories of breast cancer in relation to menstrually-related and non-menstrually-related migraine. History of migraine was not associated with breast cancer overall. Migraine showed an inverse association with ductal carcinoma in situ (HR = 0.77; 95% CI (0.62,0.96)). Also, women with non-menstrually-related migraine had increased risk (HR = 1.30, 95% CI (0.93,1.81)) while women with menstrually-related migraine had decreased risk (HR = 0.63, 95% CI (0.42,0.96)) of hormone-receptor-negative (ER-/PR-) cancer, with a significant contrast in estimated effects (P = 0.005). While replication of these subset-based findings will be needed, effect specificity could suggest that while migraine has little overall association with breast cancer, menstrual migraine may be associated with reduced risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer.

PMID:
26456840
PMCID:
PMC4601076
DOI:
10.1038/srep14943
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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