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Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;58:184-93. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2015.09.007. Epub 2015 Oct 9.

Associations between paternal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and reproductive outcomes among couples seeking fertility treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
6
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: rhauser@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Limited evidence suggests that male exposure to ubiquitous environmental phthalates may result in poor reproductive outcomes among female partners.

METHODS:

This analysis included male-female couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intrauterine insemination (IUI). We evaluated associations between the geometric mean of paternal specific gravity-adjusted urinary phthalate concentrations prior to the female partners' cycle and fertilization, embryo quality, implantation, and live birth using generalized linear mixed models.

RESULTS:

Two-hundred eighteen couples underwent 211 IVF and 195 IUI cycles. Trends were observed between paternal urinary mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP; P=0.01) and mono(carboxyoctyl) phthalate (MCOP; P=0.01) and decreased odds of implantation. MCPP and MCOP were also associated with decreased odds of live birth following IVF (P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively), and monobutyl phthalate above the first quartile was significantly associated with decreased odds of live birth following IUI (P=0.04). However, most urinary phthalate metabolites were not associated with these reproductive outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Selected phthalates were associated with decreased odds of implantation and live birth.

KEYWORDS:

Assisted reproduction; Fertility; Male reproduction; Phthalates

PMID:
26456810
PMCID:
PMC4690752
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2015.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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