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Sci Rep. 2015 Oct 12;5:14914. doi: 10.1038/srep14914.

Polarization: A Key Difference between Man-made and Natural Electromagnetic Fields, in regard to Biological Activity.

Author information

1
National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", Athens, Greece.
2
Department of Biology, University of Athens, Greece.
3
Radiation and Environmental Biophysics Research Centre, Greece.
4
Experimental Dermatology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
The Science and Public Policy Institute, Institute for Healthful Adaptation, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

In the present study we analyze the role of polarization in the biological activity of Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs)/Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR). All types of man-made EMFs/EMR - in contrast to natural EMFs/EMR - are polarized. Polarized EMFs/EMR can have increased biological activity, due to: 1) Ability to produce constructive interference effects and amplify their intensities at many locations. 2) Ability to force all charged/polar molecules and especially free ions within and around all living cells to oscillate on parallel planes and in phase with the applied polarized field. Such ionic forced-oscillations exert additive electrostatic forces on the sensors of cell membrane electro-sensitive ion channels, resulting in their irregular gating and consequent disruption of the cell's electrochemical balance. These features render man-made EMFs/EMR more bioactive than natural non-ionizing EMFs/EMR. This explains the increasing number of biological effects discovered during the past few decades to be induced by man-made EMFs, in contrast to natural EMFs in the terrestrial environment which have always been present throughout evolution, although human exposure to the latter ones is normally of significantly higher intensities/energy and longer durations. Thus, polarization seems to be a trigger that significantly increases the probability for the initiation of biological/health effects.

PMID:
26456585
PMCID:
PMC4601073
DOI:
10.1038/srep14914
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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