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Clin Microbiol Infect. 2016 Jan;22(1):65.e1-65.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2015.09.022. Epub 2015 Oct 8.

Tropheryma whipplei in children with diarrhoea in rural Ghana.

Author information

1
I. Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; Clinical Research Group, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: c.vinnemeier@uke.de.
2
Department for Medical Microbiology, Virology and Hygiene, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Infectious Diseases Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.
4
I. Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; Clinical Research Group, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.
5
Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana.
6
I. Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
7
Faculty of Medicine, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
8
Molecular Parasitology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.
9
I. Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Vaccine Business Unit, Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Tropheryma whipplei has been hypothesized to be able to cause diarrhoea, but data from young children are scarce. In this hospital-based case-control study 534 stool samples of children aged between 2 months and 15 years from rural Ghana were analysed for the presence of T. whipplei. Overall stool prevalence of T. whipplei was high (27.5%). Although there was no difference in T. whipplei carriage overall between cases and controls, cases aged between 0 and 12 months carried T. whipplei in their stool twice as often as controls without diarrhoea. The results from this study may support the hypothesis that T. whipplei can cause diarrhoea in first-time infection.

KEYWORDS:

Africa; Tropheryma whipplei; children; diarrhoea; gastroenteritis; sub-Saharan; under-five-mortality

PMID:
26456475
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmi.2015.09.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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