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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2015 Dec;62(6):1479-92. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2015.07.007. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

Gut Microbiome and the Development of Food Allergy and Allergic Disease.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University, 225 East Chicago Avenue, #60, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 225 East Chicago Avenue, #60, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology-Immunology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Searle Building 3-403, 320 E. Superior Street, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
3
Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 730 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
4
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University, 225 East Chicago Avenue, #60, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 225 East Chicago Avenue, #60, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: anne-singh@northwestern.edu.

Abstract

The impact of gut microbiome on human development, nutritional needs, and disease has become evident with advances in the ability to study these complex communities of microorganisms, and there is growing appreciation for the role of the microbiome in immune regulation. Several studies have examined associations between changes in the commensal microbiota and the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and asthma, but far less have evaluated the impact of the microbiome on the development of food allergy. This article reviews the human gastrointestinal microbiome, focusing on the theory and evidence for its role in the development of IgE-mediated food allergy and other allergic diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Allergic disease; Allergic rhinitis; Asthma; Commensal flora; Eczema; Food allergy; Gut microbiota; Microbiome

PMID:
26456445
PMCID:
PMC4721650
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2015.07.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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