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Trends Cogn Sci. 2015 Dec;19(12):783-796. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2015.09.002. Epub 2015 Oct 7.

Who is That? Brain Networks and Mechanisms for Identifying Individuals.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tübingen, Germany; Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, University College London, London, WC1H 0AP, UK.
2
Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QB, UK.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
4
Department of Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tübingen, Germany; Division of Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.
5
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University Medical School, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Electronic address: chris.petkov@ncl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Social animals can identify conspecifics by many forms of sensory input. However, whether the neuronal computations that support this ability to identify individuals rely on modality-independent convergence or involve ongoing synergistic interactions along the multiple sensory streams remains controversial. Direct neuronal measurements at relevant brain sites could address such questions, but this requires better bridging the work in humans and animal models. Here, we overview recent studies in nonhuman primates on voice and face identity-sensitive pathways and evaluate the correspondences to relevant findings in humans. This synthesis provides insights into converging sensory streams in the primate anterior temporal lobe (ATL) for identity processing. Furthermore, we advance a model and suggest how alternative neuronal mechanisms could be tested.

KEYWORDS:

face; human; identity; multisensory; primate; temporal lobe; voice

PMID:
26454482
PMCID:
PMC4673906
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2015.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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