Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuron. 2015 Oct 7;88(1):145-66. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.029.

Behavioral, Neural, and Computational Principles of Bodily Self-Consciousness.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Center for Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 9 Chemin des Mines, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Neurology, University of Geneva, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: olaf.blanke@epfl.ch.
2
ICREA-University of Barcelona, Campus de Mundet, 08035 Barcelona, Spain; Department of Computer Science, University College London, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
3
Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Center for Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 9 Chemin des Mines, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: andrea.serino@epfl.ch.

Abstract

Recent work in human cognitive neuroscience has linked self-consciousness to the processing of multisensory bodily signals (bodily self-consciousness [BSC]) in fronto-parietal cortex and more posterior temporo-parietal regions. We highlight the behavioral, neurophysiological, neuroimaging, and computational laws that subtend BSC in humans and non-human primates. We propose that BSC includes body-centered perception (hand, face, and trunk), based on the integration of proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual bodily inputs, and involves spatio-temporal mechanisms integrating multisensory bodily stimuli within peripersonal space (PPS). We develop four major constraints of BSC (proprioception, body-related visual information, PPS, and embodiment) and argue that the fronto-parietal and temporo-parietal processing of trunk-centered multisensory signals in PPS is of particular relevance for theoretical models and simulations of BSC and eventually of self-consciousness.

PMID:
26447578
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center