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Calcif Tissue Int. 2016 Jan;98(1):1-17. doi: 10.1007/s00223-015-0062-x. Epub 2015 Oct 7.

Effects of Dairy Products Consumption on Health: Benefits and Beliefs--A Commentary from the Belgian Bone Club and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Gynaecology-Obstetrics, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Department of Medicine, CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
3
Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.
4
Department of Radioisotopes, CHU Brugmann, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Metabolic Bone Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
6
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
7
University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
8
Department of Rheumatology, Saint Luc University Hospital, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
9
Gerontology and Geriatrics Section, Department of Experimental Medicine, Katholiek Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
10
Department of Rheumatology and Endocrinology, State University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
11
Department of Endocrinology, State University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
12
Division of Bones Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
13
Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. jyreginster@ulg.ac.be.

Abstract

Dairy products provide a package of essential nutrients that is difficult to obtain in low-dairy or dairy-free diets, and for many people it is not possible to achieve recommended daily calcium intakes with a dairy-free diet. Despite the established benefits for bone health, some people avoid dairy in their diet due to beliefs that dairy may be detrimental to health, especially in those with weight management issues, lactose intolerance, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or trying to avoid cardiovascular disease. This review provides information for health professionals to enable them to help their patients make informed decisions about consuming dairy products as part of a balanced diet. There may be a weak association between dairy consumption and a possible small weight reduction, with decreases in fat mass and waist circumference and increases in lean body mass. Lactose intolerant individuals may not need to completely eliminate dairy products from their diet, as both yogurt and hard cheese are well tolerated. Among people with arthritis, there is no evidence for a benefit to avoid dairy consumption. Dairy products do not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly if low fat. Intake of up to three servings of dairy products per day appears to be safe and may confer a favourable benefit with regard to bone health.

KEYWORDS:

Arthritis; Cardiovascular disease; Dairy products; Lactose intolerance; Osteoporosis; Weight management

PMID:
26445771
PMCID:
PMC4703621
DOI:
10.1007/s00223-015-0062-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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