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Trends Plant Sci. 2015 Nov;20(11):741-753. doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2015.07.010. Epub 2015 Oct 3.

Genetic and Biochemical Mechanisms of Pollen Wall Development.

Author information

1
Joint International Research Laboratory of Metabolic and Developmental Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)-University of Adelaide Joint Centre for Agriculture and Health, State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China.
2
Joint International Research Laboratory of Metabolic and Developmental Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)-University of Adelaide Joint Centre for Agriculture and Health, State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China; Department of Oriental Medicinal Biotechnology and Graduate School of Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University, Youngin, 446-701, South Korea.
3
Joint International Research Laboratory of Metabolic and Developmental Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)-University of Adelaide Joint Centre for Agriculture and Health, State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China; School of Agriculture, Food, and Wine, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5064, Australia. Electronic address: zhangdb@sjtu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The pollen wall is a specialized extracellular cell wall matrix that surrounds male gametophytes and plays an essential role in plant reproduction. Uncovering the mechanisms that control the synthesis and polymerization of the precursors of pollen wall components has been a major research focus in plant biology. We review current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying pollen wall development in eudicot model Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot model rice (Oryza sativa), focusing on the genes involved in the biosynthesis, transport, and assembly of various precursors of pollen wall components. The conserved and divergent aspects of the genes involved as well as their regulation are addressed. Current challenges and future perspectives are also highlighted.

KEYWORDS:

Coordinated regulation; evolution; exine; intine; tapetum; tryphine

PMID:
26442683
DOI:
10.1016/j.tplants.2015.07.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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