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Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2015 Nov 23;54(48):14372-7. doi: 10.1002/anie.201506952. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

Direct Air Capture of CO2 by Physisorbent Materials.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical & Environmental Sciences, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland).
2
Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland).
3
Department of Chemical & Environmental Sciences, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland). teresa.curtin@ul.ie.
4
Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland). teresa.curtin@ul.ie.
5
Department of Chemical & Environmental Sciences, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland). Michael.Zaworotko@ul.ie.
6
Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Plassey House, Limerick (Republic of Ireland). Michael.Zaworotko@ul.ie.

Abstract

Sequestration of CO2, either from gas mixtures or directly from air (direct air capture, DAC), could mitigate carbon emissions. Here five materials are investigated for their ability to adsorb CO2 directly from air and other gas mixtures. The sorbents studied are benchmark materials that encompass four types of porous material, one chemisorbent, TEPA-SBA-15 (amine-modified mesoporous silica) and four physisorbents: Zeolite 13X (inorganic); HKUST-1 and Mg-MOF-74/Mg-dobdc (metal-organic frameworks, MOFs); SIFSIX-3-Ni, (hybrid ultramicroporous material). Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments afforded information about the contents of each sorbent under equilibrium conditions and their ease of recycling. Accelerated stability tests addressed projected shelf-life of the five sorbents. The four physisorbents were found to be capable of carbon capture from CO2-rich gas mixtures, but competition and reaction with atmospheric moisture significantly reduced their DAC performance.

KEYWORDS:

adsorption; physisorption; temperature-programmed desorption; ultramicroporous materials; water stability

PMID:
26440308
DOI:
10.1002/anie.201506952

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