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Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2016 Apr 29;19(5). pii: pyv114. doi: 10.1093/ijnp/pyv114. Print 2016 May.

Gut Microbiota and Brain Function: An Evolving Field in Neuroscience.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University; and Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada (Dr Foster); Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (Dr Lyte); Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (Dr Meyer); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience and APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Ireland (Dr Cryan). jfoster@mcmaster.ca.
2
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University; and Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada (Dr Foster); Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (Dr Lyte); Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (Dr Meyer); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience and APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Ireland (Dr Cryan).

Abstract

There is a growing appreciation of the importance of gut microbiota to health and disease. This has been driven by advances in sequencing technology and recent findings demonstrating the important role of microbiota in common health disorders such as obesity. Moreover, the potential role of gut microbiota in influencing brain function, behavior, and mental health has attracted the attention of neuroscientists and psychiatrists. At the 29(th) International College of Neuropsychopharmacology (CINP) World Congress held in Vancouver, Canada, in June 2014, a group of experts presented the symposium, "Gut microbiota and brain function: Relevance to psychiatric disorders" to review the latest findings in how gut microbiota may play a role in brain function, behavior, and disease. The symposium covered a broad range of topics, including gut microbiota and neuroendocrine function, the influence of gut microbiota on behavior, probiotics as regulators of brain and behavior, and imaging the gut-brain axis in humans. This report provides an overview of these presentations.

KEYWORDS:

Behavior; MRI; brain imaging; immune; neuroendocrine; probiotic

PMID:
26438800
PMCID:
PMC4886662
DOI:
10.1093/ijnp/pyv114
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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