Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Paediatr Child Health. 2016 Feb;52(2):168-73. doi: 10.1111/jpc.12998. Epub 2015 Oct 5.

Diagnosing appendicitis: What works, what does not and where to go from here?

Craig S1,2,3,4, Dalton S3,5,6.

Author information

1
Emergency Medicine Training, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
5
The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
6
Clinical Excellence Commission, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

Although acute appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery in children, diagnosis is far from straightforward. Delays in diagnosis can result in significant complications, whereas over-diagnosis can result in costly inter-hospital transfers and unnecessary surgery. This article aims to describe current evidence-based assessment of children with possible appendicitis presenting to the emergency department. We provide an overview of the literature relating to the various available diagnostic approaches, including the application of history, examination, pathology tests, imaging, and clinical decision rules.

KEYWORDS:

appendicitis; diagnosis; paediatrics; ultrasonography

PMID:
26437742
DOI:
10.1111/jpc.12998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center