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Cell Signal. 2015 Dec;27(12):2543-54. doi: 10.1016/j.cellsig.2015.09.020. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

Differential submitochondrial localization of PINK1 as a molecular switch for mediating distinct mitochondrial signaling pathways.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
2
Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address: chinl@pharm.emory.edu.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address: lianli@pharm.emory.edu.

Abstract

Mutations in mitochondrial kinase PINK1 cause Parkinson disease (PD), but the submitochondrial site(s) of PINK1 action remains unclear. Here, we report that three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) enables super-resolution imaging of protein submitochondrial localization. Dual-color 3D-SIM imaging analysis revealed that PINK1 resides in the cristae membrane and intracristae space but not on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) of healthy mitochondria. Under normal physiological conditions, PINK1 colocalizes with its substrate TRAP1 in the cristae membrane and intracristae space. In response to mitochondrial depolarization, PINK1, but not TRAP1, translocates to the OMM. The PINK1 translocation to the OMM of depolarized mitochondria is independent of new protein synthesis and requires combined action of PINK1 transmembrane domain and C-terminal region. We found that mitochondrial depolarization-induced PINK1 OMM translocation is required for recruitment of parkin to the OMM of damaged mitochondria. Our findings suggest that differential submitochondrial localization of PINK1 serves as a molecular switch for mediating two distinct mitochondrial signaling pathways in maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Furthermore, our study provides evidence for the involvement of deregulated PINK1 submitochondrial localization in PD pathogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

PINK1; Parkin; Parkinson disease; TRAP1; Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy

PMID:
26436374
PMCID:
PMC4684445
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellsig.2015.09.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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