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Metab Brain Dis. 2016 Feb;31(1):37-44. doi: 10.1007/s11011-015-9733-6. Epub 2015 Oct 5.

Honey prevents neurobehavioural deficit and oxidative stress induced by lead acetate exposure in male Wistar rats- a preliminary study.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. abdulmajeed.w@unilorin.edu.ng.
2
Department of Physiology Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.
3
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.
4
Department of Chemical Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.

Abstract

This research sought to investigate the possible neuroprotective effects of honey against lead (Pb)-induced neurotoxicity. Twenty four male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Control group that received 1 ml/kg distilled orally for 28 days; while groups II-IV received 0.2% lead in drinking water and 1 ml/kg of distilled water, 1 ml/kg of honey, 1.5 ml/kg of honey respectively for 28 days. Anxiety and exploratory activities were determined in the open field test. Memory function was determined using Morris water maze after which the animals were sacrificed. The brains were then excised, homogenized and Lipid peroxidation (MDA), Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase, Glutathione (GSH) and Glutathione -S- Transferase (GST) activities were determined in the brains. Results showed that lead exposure causes decrease in locomotor and exploratory activities; increase anxiety, memory impairment, lipid peroxidation and decrease antioxidant activities. However, co-administration of honey with lead inhibited neurotoxicity as indicated by the improvement in memory function as evidenced by decreased latency period and increased in time spent in target quadrant in honey-fed rats compared to the lead-exposed animals. Furthermore, honey increased locomotion, exploration and decreased anxiety in lead-exposed rats as indicated by the frequency of rearing, freezing duration and the number of line crossed by animals. Also administration of honey improves antioxidant activities as shown by increased brain SOD, GST and GSH activities compared to the lead-treated groups but no significant effect on MDA level. It can be concluded that honey has neuroprotective effects against lead-induced cognitive deficit probably by enhancing antioxidant activities.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Honey; Locomotion; Memory; Neurotoxicity

PMID:
26435406
DOI:
10.1007/s11011-015-9733-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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