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J Mol Biol. 2015 Nov 20;427(23):3744-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jmb.2015.09.018. Epub 2015 Oct 3.

Bacterial danger sensing.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: mougous@uw.edu.

Abstract

Here we propose that bacteria detect and respond to threats posed by other bacteria via an innate immune-like process that we term danger sensing. We find support for this contention by reexamining existing literature from the perspective that intermicrobial antagonism, not opportunistic pathogenesis, is the major evolutionary force shaping the defensive behaviors of most bacteria. We conclude that many bacteria possess danger sensing pathways composed of a danger signal receptor and corresponding signal transduction mechanism that regulate pathways important for survival in the presence of the perceived competitor.

KEYWORDS:

Gac/Rsm; competence; interbacterial; subinhibitory antibiotics; type VI secretion

PMID:
26434507
PMCID:
PMC4658316
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmb.2015.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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