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Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;35(4):842-51. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2015.09.007. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of Spirulina supplementation on plasma lipid concentrations.

Author information

1
Department of Functional Sciences, Discipline of Pathophysiology, "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
2
Biotechnology Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Metabolic Research Centre, Royal Perth Hospital, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
3
Department of Cardiology, "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
4
Department of Functional Sciences, Discipline of Public Health, "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
5
Faculty of Pharmacy, Discipline of Pharmaceutical Chemistry "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
6
Department of Hypertension, Chair of Nephrology and Hypertension, WAM University Hospital in Lodz, Medical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 113, 90-549 Lodz, Poland. Electronic address: maciejbanach@aol.co.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The impact of Spirulina supplementation on plasma lipid concentrations has not been conclusively studied. Therefore the aim of the meta-analysis was to assess the effect of Spirulina supplementation on plasma lipid concentrations.

METHODS:

We searched PubMed and Scopus (up to July 03, 2015) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigate the effect Spirulina supplementation on plasma lipid concentrations. Meta-analysis and meta-regression were performed using random-effects models.

RESULTS:

Random-effect meta-analysis of data from 7 RCTs showed a significant effect of supplementation with spirulina in reducing plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (WMD: -46.76 mg/dL, 95% CI: -67.31 to -26.22, p < 0.001), LDL-C (WMD: -41.32 mg/dL, 95% CI: -60.62 to -22.03, p < 0.001) and triglycerides (WMD: -44.23 mg/dL, 95% CI: -50.22 to -38.24, p < 0.001), and elevating those of HDL-C (WMD: 6.06 mg/dL, 95% CI: 2.37-9.76, p = 0.001). The impact of spirulina on plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (slope: -1.32; 95% CI: -8.58 to 5.93; p = 0.720), LDL-C (slope: -1.01; 95% CI: -8.03 to 6.02; p = 0.778), triglycerides (slope: -1.39; 95% CI: -4.26 to 1.48; p = 0.342) and HDL-C (slope: 1.79, 95% CI: -0.48 to 4.05; p = 0.122) was independent of administered dose. Regarding duration of supplementation with Spirulina, significant associations were found with changes in plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (slope: -1.77; 95% CI: -3.48 to -0.07; p = 0.042), LDL-C (slope: -1.73; 95% CI: -3.40 to -0.06; p = 0.042) HDL-C (slope: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.68-1.14; p < 0.001) and triglycerides (slope: -1.39; 95% CI: -2.28 to -0.50; p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS:

This meta-analysis showed a significant effect of supplementation with Spirulina in reducing plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides and elevating those of HDL-C.

KEYWORDS:

HDL-cholesterol; LDL-cholesterol; Lipid; Meta-analysis; Spirulina platensis; Systematic review

PMID:
26433766
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2015.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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