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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2015 Dec;34(12):2331-8. doi: 10.1007/s10096-015-2485-8. Epub 2015 Oct 2.

Triclosan-coated sutures and sternal wound infections: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Landspitali University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
3
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
4
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden. anders.jeppsson@vgregion.se.
5
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. anders.jeppsson@vgregion.se.

Abstract

Surgical site infection is a common complication following cardiac surgery. Triclosan-coated sutures have been shown to reduce the rate of infections in various surgical wounds, including wounds after vein harvesting in coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Our purpose was to compare the rate of infections in sternotomy wounds closed with triclosan-coated or conventional sutures. A total of 357 patients that underwent coronary artery bypass grafting were included in a prospective randomized double-blind single-center study. The patients were randomized to closure of the sternal wound with either triclosan-coated sutures (Vicryl Plus and Monocryl Plus, Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) (n = 179) or identical sutures without triclosan (n = 178). Patients were followed up after 30 days (clinical visit) and 60 days (telephone interview). The primary endpoint was the prevalence of sternal wound infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The demographics in both groups were comparable, including age, gender, body mass index, and rate of diabetes and smoking. Sternal wound infection was diagnosed in 43 patients; 23 (12.8%) sutured with triclosan-coated sutures compared to 20 (11.2%) sutured without triclosan (p = 0.640). Most infections were superficial (n = 36, 10.1%), while 7 (2.0%) were deep sternal wound infections. There were 16 positive cultures in the triclosan group and 17 in the non-coated suture group (p = 0.842). The most commonly identified main pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (45.4%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (36.4%). Skin closure with triclosan-coated sutures did not reduce the rate of sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass grafting. (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01212315).

PMID:
26432552
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-015-2485-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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