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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2015 Dec;59:238-50. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.09.016. Epub 2015 Sep 30.

An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

Author information

1
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Kiwistraat 43, The Hague 2552 DH, The Netherlands.
2
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Kiwistraat 43, The Hague 2552 DH, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, Groningen 9713 AV, The Netherlands.
4
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Kiwistraat 43, The Hague 2552 DH, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, 722 West 168th St., New York, NY, USA.
5
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Kiwistraat 43, The Hague 2552 DH, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.goekoop@parnassia.nl.

Abstract

The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Attractor network; Central executive network; Default-mode network; Delusions; Dopamine; Functional connectivity; Functional neuroimaging; GABA inhibition; Hallucinations; Integrative science; NMDA excitation; Network science; Neural networks; Neuromodulation; Psychosis; Resting-state connectivity; Salience network; Scale free; Schizophrenia; Social networks

PMID:
26432501
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.09.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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