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Microb Pathog. 2015 Dec;89:100-7. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2015.09.008. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

RNA modification enzymes encoded by the gid operon: Implications in biology and virulence of bacteria.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
2
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA. Electronic address: fadl@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules consist of numerous chemically modified nucleosides that are highly conserved in eukarya, archeae, and bacteria, while others are unique to each domain of life. In bacteria, hundreds of RNA modification enzymes have been identified and implicated in biological pathways associated with many cell processes. The glucose-inhibited division (gid) operon encodes genes for two RNA modification enzymes named GidA and GidB. Studies have shown GidA is essential for the proper biosynthesis of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm(5)s(2)U) of bacterial transfer RNA (tRNA) with GidB responsible for the methylation of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Furthermore, deletion of gidA and gidB has shown to alter numerous bacterial properties like virulence, stress response, morphology, growth, antibiotic susceptibility, and others. In this review, we discuss the present knowledge of the RNA modification enzymes GidA and GidB, and their potential role in the biology and virulence of bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic resistance; GidA; GidB; Pathogenesis; Stress response

PMID:
26427881
DOI:
10.1016/j.micpath.2015.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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