Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arthroscopy. 2016 Jan;32(1):203-8. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2015.07.021. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

Does Femoroacetabular Impingement Cause Hip Instability? A Systematic Review.

Author information

1
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Hip Preservation Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, U.S.A.
2
Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
3
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Hip Preservation Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, U.S.A.. Electronic address: brian_giordano@urmc.rochester.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is associated with hip instability.

METHODS:

A systematic search examining FAI and hip instability was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Clinical and basic science studies were included. Instability had to be documented with either a clinical or imaging examination. Studies were excluded if they did not define diagnostic criteria for FAI, involved prosthetic hips, were not in English, were review articles, or reported Level V evidence (case reports, expert opinion). Rates of FAI morphologic features in patients with documented hip instability were determined. Mechanisms and rates of FAI-induced hip subluxation were examined in basic science studies.

RESULTS:

The search yielded 1,630 relevant studies. Seven studies (4 clinical and 3 basic science) met inclusion criteria. Four studies investigated an association between FAI and hip instability in 92 patients with an average age of 31 years. Seventy-six patients experienced frank dislocations and 16 experienced posterior subluxation events. The prevalence of FAI was documented in 89 patients with hip instability. The rates of cam and pincer morphologic characteristics were 74% and 64%, respectively. The average lateral center edge angle and prevalence of acetabular retroversion were 30° and 70%, respectively (n = 76 patients). All 3 basic science studies had real-time visualization of FAI-induced hip subluxations.

CONCLUSIONS:

High rates of FAI morphologic characteristics are present in patients with hip instability. FAI morphologic characteristics may predispose the hip to instability through anatomic conflict caused by pincer or cam lesions (or both) levering the femoral head posteriorly.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level IV, systematic review of Level III, Level IV, and non-clinical studies.

PMID:
26427629
DOI:
10.1016/j.arthro.2015.07.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center