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Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Nov 3;49(21):12641-61. doi: 10.1021/acs.est.5b03149. Epub 2015 Oct 14.

Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, BITS Pilani Hyderabad Campus , Hyderabad, India.
2
Granules India Ltd, Gagillapur, Hyderabad, India.
3
Reaction Engineering Laboratory, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology , Hyderabad, India.

Abstract

Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments.

PMID:
26422294
DOI:
10.1021/acs.est.5b03149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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