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Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk. 2015 Nov;15(11):e143-9. doi: 10.1016/j.clml.2015.07.645. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

Treatment of Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Lenalidomide in Clinical Routine in Austria.

Author information

1
Internal Medicine I, Medical Oncology, Hematology and Gastroenterology, Bamherzige Schwestern Hospital, Linz, Austria.
2
Department of Internal Medicine III, Hospital Salzburg-Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria.
3
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
4
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria.
5
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
6
Department of Internal Medicine IV, Hospital Wels-Grieskirchen, Wels, Austria.
7
Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Natters, Natters, Austria.
8
Department of Hematology and Oncology, General Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria.
9
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Elisabethinen Hospital Linz, Linz, Austria.
10
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Hospital Leoben, Leoben, Austria.
11
Internal Medicine I, Medical Oncology, Hematology and Gastroenterology, Bamherzige Schwestern Hospital, Linz, Austria. Electronic address: andreas.petzer@bhs.at.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy for therapy of lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with 5q(-). The present evaluation aimed to describe the characteristics and outcomes of low-risk MDS patients treated with lenalidomide in Austria.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

For this retrospective, multicenter, observational analysis of MDS patients who received lenalidomide, data were collected at various hospitals in Austria over a period of 3 years. MDS classification, previous and current MDS therapies, and outcome and safety of lenalidomide were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Forty-six percent of the patients (n = 23) had a 5q(-) syndrome, while 12% (n = 6) exhibited 5q(-) plus additional aberrations or isolated 5q(-) but ≥ 5% blasts in the bone marrow (10%, n = 5). The remaining 32% of patients (n = 16) had MDS with other World Health Organization classifications. Seventy percent belonged to lower International Prognostic Scoring System risk classes. Sixteen centers participated, involving a total of 50 patients. Most frequently used lenalidomide doses were 10 mg and 5 mg on days 1 to 21 of a 28-day cycle. Seventy-five percent of the patients received 11 months of treatment, with a median therapy period of 3.5 months; median follow-up was 3.9 months (range, 0-26 months). Response rate, defined as transfusion independence during the 2 months after lenalidomide therapy, was 64%. Median overall survival was not reached.

CONCLUSION:

Lenalidomide was well tolerated and is an effective and well-tolerated option for therapy of patients with 5q(-) syndrome but also lower-risk MDS patients with other World Health Organization classifications in clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

5q deletion; Lenalidomide; MDS clinical practice; Myelodysplastic syndromes

PMID:
26422252
DOI:
10.1016/j.clml.2015.07.645
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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