Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obes Facts. 2015;8(5):293-301. doi: 10.1159/000438681. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

Self-Compassion as a Resource in the Self-Stigma Process of Overweight and Obese Individuals.

Author information

1
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Self-stigma in overweight and obese individuals has strong associations with impairment in mental and global health. This study sought to explore self-compassion as a psychological resource in the self-stigma process.

METHODS:

In a 2012 representative German population survey of N = 1,158 overweight and obese individuals, self-compassion was examined as a mediator between self-stigma and mental and physical health outcomes, including BMI (kg/m2), using structural equation modeling and controlling for sociodemographic factors.

RESULTS:

Psychological variables were assessed using validated self-report questionnaires. Self-compassion partially mediated the relationships between self-stigma and depression, somatic symptoms, and health status/quality of life, lowering the predictive effect of self-stigma on the outcomes by approximately one-third. In contrast, self-compassion, because it was unrelated to BMI, did not mediate the association between self-stigma and BMI.

CONCLUSION:

Self-compassion has the potential to act as a buffer against the mental and global health detriments of self-stigma in overweight and obesity and could thus represent a target for interventions to reduce self-stigma and prevent these health impairments. In order to influence the association between self-stigma and BMI, self-compassion should conceptually be linked to weight management.

PMID:
26422226
PMCID:
PMC5644803
DOI:
10.1159/000438681
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for S. Karger AG, Basel, Switzerland Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center