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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2015;864:37-53. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-20579-3_4.

Biobanking: The Future of Cell Preservation Strategies.

Author information

1
CPSI Biotech, 2 Court St., Owego, NY, 13827, USA. jmbaust@cpsibiotech.com.
2
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York at Binghamton, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA. jmbaust@cpsibiotech.com.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, USA. jmbaust@cpsibiotech.com.
4
Research and Development, CPSI Biotech, 2 Court St., Owego, NY, 13827, USA. wcorwin@cpsibiotech.com.
5
Institute of Biomedical Technology, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, USA. wcorwin@cpsibiotech.com.
6
CPSI Biotech, 2 Court St., Owego, NY, 13827, USA. rvanbus@binghamton.edu.
7
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York at Binghamton, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA. rvanbus@binghamton.edu.
8
Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA. rvanbus@binghamton.edu.
9
Institute of Biomedical Technology, State University of New York at Binghamton, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA. Baustcryo@aol.com.
10
Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA. Baustcryo@aol.com.

Abstract

With established techniques cryopreservation is often viewed as an "old school" discipline yet modern cryopreservation is undergoing another scientific and technology development growth phase. In this regard, today's cryopreservation processes and cryopreserved products are found at the forefront of research in the areas of discovery science, stem cell research, diagnostic development and personalized medicine. As the utilization of cryopreserved cells continues to increase, the demands placed on the biobanking industry are increasing and evolving at an accelerated rate. No longer are samples providing for high immediate post-thaw viability adequate. Researchers are now requiring samples where not only is there high cell recovery but that the product recovered is physiologically and biochemically identical to its pre-freeze state at the genominic, proteomic, structural, functional and reproductive levels. Given this, biobanks are now facing the challenge of adapting strategies and protocols to address these needs moving forward. Recent studies have shown that the control and direction of the molecular response of cells to cryopreservation significantly impacts final outcome. This chapter provides an overview of the molecular stress responses of cells to cryopreservation, the impact of the apoptotic and necrotic cell death continuum and how studies focused on the targeted modulation of common and/or cell specific responses to freezing temperatures provide a path to improving sample quality and utility. This line of investigation has provided a new direction and molecular-based foundation guiding new research, technology development and procedures. As the use of and the knowledge base surrounding cryopreservation continues to expand, this path will continue to provide for improvements in overall efficacy and outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Biopreservation; Cell storage; Cryopreservation; Cryopreservation induced cell death; Freeze injury; Improved survival; Molecular control; Necroptosis; Thawing

PMID:
26420612
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-20579-3_4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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