Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2015;24(3):379-86. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.3.13.

Emerging malnutrition during hospitalisation independently predicts poor 3-month outcomes after acute stroke: data from a Chinese cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Disease (NCRC-ND), Center of Stroke, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine for Cerebrovascular Disease, Beijing, China.
2
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjing, China.
3
Renji Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
4
Branch of Shanghai First People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
5
Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
6
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
7
Hubei General Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
8
Ruijin Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
9
Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China.
10
Tangshan Worker Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Tangshan, China.
11
Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, China, Nanjing, China.
12
Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Disease (NCRC-ND), Center of Stroke, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine for Cerebrovascular Disease, Beijing, China. Email: yongjunwang1962@gmail.com.

Abstract

in English, Chinese

OBJECTIVE:

Questions exist regarding the causal relationship between malnutrition and stroke outcomes. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status changes or malnutrition during hospitalisation could predict 3-month outcomes in acute stroke patients.

METHODS:

During a 10-month period, patients who suffered their first stroke within 7 days after stroke onset were included in this prospective multi-centre study. The demographic parameters, stroke risk and severity factors, malnutrition risk factors and dysphagia were recorded. Nutritional status was assessed by 3 anthropometric and 3 biochemical indices. Changes in nutritional status were defined by comparing the admission values with the 2-week values. A Modified Rankin Scale score of 3-6 was defined as a poor outcome at the 3-month follow-up. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the power of nutritional status changes in predicting poor patient outcomes.

RESULTS:

Data from 760 patients were analysed. Poor outcomes were observed in 264 (34.7%) patients. Malnutrition prevalence was 3.8% at admission and 7.5% after 2-weeks in hospital, which could not predict 3-month outcome. Emerging malnutrition was observed in 36 patients (4.7%) during the 2-week hospitalisation period and independently predicted poor 3-month outcomes after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.83).

CONCLUSIONS:

Emerging malnutrition during hospitalisation independently predicted poor 3-month outcomes in acute stroke patients in this study.

PMID:
26420177
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.2015.24.3.13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HEC Press, Healthy Eating Club PTY LTD
Loading ...
Support Center