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Ann Med. 2015;47(6):512-8. doi: 10.3109/07853890.2015.1075658. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

The association between job strain and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Author information

1
a Shenzhen Psychiatric College, Anhui Medical University , Shenzhen, Guangdong , PR China.
2
b Department of Psychiatry , Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Psychological Health Center , Shenzhen, Guangdong , PR China.
3
c Department of Cardiology , the First People's Hospital of Shunde (the Affiliated Hospital at Shunde, Southern Medical University) , Foshan, Guangdong , China.
4
d Department of Medical Psychology , Anhui Medical University , Hefei, Anhui , PR China.
5
e School of Nursing, Anhui Medical University , Hefei, Anhui , PR China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies about work stress and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) have yielded inconsistent results. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between job strain and the risk of CHD.

METHODS:

We searched PubMed and Embase databases for studies reporting data on job strain and the risk of CHD. Studies were included if they reported multiple-adjusted relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) with respect to CHD from job strain.

RESULTS:

Fourteen prospective cohort studies comprising 232,767 participants were included. The risk of CHD was increased in high-strain (RR 1.26; 95% CI 1.12-1.41) and passive jobs (RR 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.29) but not in active jobs (RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.97-1.22), when compared with low-strain group. The increased risk of CHD in high-strain and passive jobs was mainly driven by studies with a follow-up duration of ≥ 10 years. Neither the low-control (RR 1.06; 95% CI 0.93-1.19) nor high-demand (RR 1.13; 95% CI 0.97-1.32) dimension was independently associated with the risk of CHD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Individuals with high-strain and passive jobs were more likely to experience a CHD event. Intervention programs incorporating individual and organizational levels are crucial for reducing job strain and the risk of CHD.

KEYWORDS:

Coronary heart disease; job strain; meta-analysis; work stress

PMID:
26416502
DOI:
10.3109/07853890.2015.1075658
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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