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Sci Total Environ. 2016 Jan 15;541:161-166. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.058. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Regional contribution to PM1 pollution during winter haze in Yangtze River Delta, China.

Author information

1
Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; Jiangsu Environmental Monitoring Center, Nanjing 210036, China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China. Electronic address: hongxiayu01@aliyun.com.
3
Institute for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China.
4
Jiangsu Environmental Monitoring Center, Nanjing 210036, China.
5
Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China.

Abstract

To quantify regional sources contributing to submicron particulate matter (PM1) pollution in haze episodes, on-line measurements combining two modeling methods, namely, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM), were conducted for the period of one month in urban Nanjing, a city located in the western part of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China. Several multi-day haze episodes were observed in December 2013. Long-range transport of biomass burning from the southwestern YRD region largely contributed to PM1 pollution with more than 25% of total organics mass in a lasting heavy haze. The LPDM analysis indicates that regional transport is a main source contributing to secondary low-volatility production. The high-potential source regions of secondary low-volatility production are mainly located in areas to the northeast of the city. High aerosol pollution was mainly contributed by regional transport associated with northeastern air masses. Such regional transport on average accounts for 46% of total NR-PM1 with sulfate and aged low-volatility organics being the largest fractions (>65%).

KEYWORDS:

Components; Haze; Regional source; Submicron particulate matter; Yangtze River Delta

PMID:
26414850
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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