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Res Vet Sci. 2015 Oct;102:150-8. doi: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2015.07.022. Epub 2015 Aug 2.

Dietary Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins increase intestinal microbiome and necrotic enteritis in three commercial broiler breeds.

Author information

1
Animal Biosciences and Biotechnology Laboratory, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, USDA, ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Electronic address: JiEun.Kim@ARS.USDA.GOV.
2
Animal Biosciences and Biotechnology Laboratory, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, USDA, ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Electronic address: Hyun.Lillehoj@ARS.USDA.GOV.
3
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong 456-756, South Korea. Electronic address: yhong@cau.ac.kr.
4
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong 456-756, South Korea. Electronic address: kimgeun@cau.ac.kr.
5
Animal Biosciences and Biotechnology Laboratory, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, USDA, ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA; National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development Administration, Wanju, Jeollabuk-do 565-851, South Korea. Electronic address: lshin@korea.kr.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: elillehoj@peds.umaryland.ed.
7
InVivo ANH, Talhouƫt, 56250 St. Nolff, France. Electronic address: David.BRAVO@pancosma.ch.

Abstract

Three commercial broiler breeds were fed from hatch with a diet supplemented with Capsicum and Curcuma longa oleoresins, and co-infected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens to induce necrotic enteritis (NE). Pyrotag deep sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA showed that gut microbiota compositions were quite distinct depending on the broiler breed type. In the absence of oleoresin diet, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), was decreased in infected Cobb, and increased in Ross and Hubbard, compared with the uninfected. In the absence of oleoresin diet, all chicken breeds had a decreased Candidatus Arthromitus, while the proportion of Lactobacillus was increased in Cobb, but decreased in Hubbard and Ross. Oleoresin supplementation of infected chickens increased OTUs in Cobb and Ross, but decreased OTUs in Hubbard, compared with unsupplemented/infected controls. Oleoresin supplementation of infected Cobb and Hubbard was associated with an increased percentage of gut Lactobacillus and decreased Selenihalanaerobacter, while Ross had a decreased fraction of Lactobacillus and increased Selenihalanaerobacter, Clostridium, Calothrix, and Geitlerinema. These results suggest that dietary Capsicum/Curcuma oleoresins reduced the negative consequences of NE on body weight and intestinal lesion, in part, through alteration of the gut microbiome in 3 commercial broiler breeds.

KEYWORDS:

Gut; Immunity; Microbiota; Necrotic enteritis; Phytonutrient

PMID:
26412535
DOI:
10.1016/j.rvsc.2015.07.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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