Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr Psychol. 2016 Apr;41(3):373-83. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv092. Epub 2015 Sep 27.

Predicting Later Study Withdrawal in Participants Active in a Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study for 1 Year: The TEDDY Study.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Science and Social Medicine, Florida State University, suzanne.johnson@med.fsu.edu.
2
Health Informatics Institute, University of South Florida.
3
Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado.
4
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
5
Helmholtz Center and Institute for Psychology, Graz University.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, and.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify predictors of later study withdrawal among participants active in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) for 1 year. 

METHODS:

Multiple logistic regression was used to discriminate 3,042 children active in TEDDY for the first 3 years from 432 children who withdrew in Years 2 or 3. Predictor variables were tested in blocks-demographic, maternal lifestyle behaviors, stress and child illness, maternal reactions to child's increased diabetes risk, in-study behaviors-and a final best model developed. 

RESULTS:

Few demographic factors predicted study withdrawal. Maternal lifestyle behaviors, accuracy of the mother's risk perception, and in-study behaviors were more important. Frequent child illnesses were associated with greater study retention. 

CONCLUSIONS:

Demographic measures are insufficient predictors of later study withdrawal among those active in a study for at least 1 year; behavioral/psychological factors offer improved prediction and guidance for the development of retention strategies.

KEYWORDS:

adherence; diabetes; genetics and genetic disorders; longitudinal research; prevention/control; research design and methods

PMID:
26412232
PMCID:
PMC5013835
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsv092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center