Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Asian J Psychiatr. 2015 Dec;18:75-80. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2015.09.003. Epub 2015 Sep 21.

Comparative trial of the WHO ASSIST-linked brief intervention and simple advice for substance abuse in primary care.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90110, Songkhla, Thailand. Electronic address: savitree.a@psu.ac.th.
2
Faculty of Nursing, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani, Thailand.
3
Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90110, Songkhla, Thailand.
4
Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90110, Songkhla, Thailand; Department of Psychiatry, Royal South Hants Hospital, and Southampton University, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Abstract

To help decrease the burden of substance-related problems, the World Health Organization developed the Alcohol, Smoking, Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) - a sensitive screening questionnaire to help identify misuse of alcohol and other substances - linked to Brief Intervention (BI). This paper compares the effectiveness of the ASSIST followed either by its linked BI or by simple advice (SA). The trial was conducted in southern Thailand. The ASSIST was used to screen patients attending primary care units and categorise them into 'low-risk', 'moderate-risk' and 'high-risk' groups. Patients at 'moderate-risk' were randomised to receive ASSIST-linked BI (n=120) or SA (n=116). The outcome measures were changes in the ASSIST-Specific Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-SSIS), ASSIST-Total Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-TSIS) and proportions of patients whose scores at three and six months had decreased from the 'moderate-risk' to 'low-risk' category. 147 patients (72 BI; 75 SA) completed the six-month trial. There were significant reductions in both ASSIST-SSIS and ASSIST-TSIS, with no significant difference between groups. The percentages of patients converted to the 'low-risk' category were 36.7% and 38.8% at month 3, and 53.3% and 53.4% at month 6, for the BI and SA groups, respectively. In conclusion, in primary care administering the ASSIST and telling patients their score, followed either by formal brief intervention or simple advice, are equally effective in decreasing substance use for up to six months.

KEYWORDS:

ASSIST; Alcohol; Brief intervention; Drug screening; Primary care; Smoking

PMID:
26412051
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajp.2015.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center