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Oncogene. 2016 Apr 28;35(17):2223-34. doi: 10.1038/onc.2015.284. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

APC haploinsufficiency coupled with p53 loss sufficiently induces mucinous cystic neoplasms and invasive pancreatic carcinoma in mice.

Kuo TL1, Weng CC1, Kuo KK2,3, Chen CY3,4, Wu DC3,5,6, Hung WC7, Cheng KH1,3,8.

Author information

1
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
2
Division of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
3
Center for Stem Cell Research, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
4
Department of Medical Imaging, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
5
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
6
Division of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
7
National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Tainan, Taiwan.
8
Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a tumor-suppressor gene critically involved in familial adenomatous polyposis, is integral in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and is implicated in the development of sporadic tumors of the distal gastrointestinal tract including pancreatic cancer (PC). Here we report for the first time that functional APC is required for the growth and maintenance of pancreatic islets and maturation. Subsequently, a non-Kras mutation-induced premalignancy mouse model was developed; in this model, APC haploinsufficiency coupled with p53 deletion resulted in the development of a distinct type of pancreatic premalignant precursors, mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), exhibiting pathomechanisms identical to those observed in human MCNs, including accumulation of cystic fluid secreted by neoplastic and ovarian-like stromal cells, with 100% penetrance and the presence of hepatic and gastric metastases in >30% of the mice. The major clinical implications of this study suggest targeting the Wnt signaling pathway as a novel strategy for managing MCN.

PMID:
26411367
DOI:
10.1038/onc.2015.284
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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