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J Crit Care. 2015 Dec;30(6):1199-203. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.08.014. Epub 2015 Aug 22.

Carotid artery corrected flow time measurement via bedside ultrasonography in monitoring volume status.

Author information

1
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Nephrology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: Shahriar_banaie@yahoo.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible correlation between corrected flow time (FTc) in carotid artery and changes in volume status.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Ninety-three patients with end-stage renal failure who underwent fluid removal via hemodialysis were enrolled prospectively. The volume of fluid removed as well as prehemodialysis and posthemodialysis measures of FTc in the carotid artery, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure was evaluated. All imaging measurements were performed with patients at supine position, 15 minutes before and after the hemodialysis session, by evaluating the right common carotid artery at the level of the lower border of thyroid cartilage.

RESULTS:

The mean FTc before fluid removal was 345.07±37.19 milliseconds. This measure decreased significantly after the volume removal with a posthemodialysis mean of 307.77±31.76 milliseconds (P<.0001). There was a statistically significant and negative association between the volume of fluid removed by hemodialysis and the changes in FTc (Pearson correlation, -0.39; P<.0001).

CONCLUSION:

The assessment of changes in FTc of carotid artery via Doppler waveform analysis may predict the changes in intravascular volume. The use of this diagnostic modality may be an accurate and noninvasive alternative to currently available methods.

KEYWORDS:

Carotid artery; Doppler; Emergency medicine; Kidney failure; Renal dialysis; Ultrasonography; chronic; common

PMID:
26410681
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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