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Technol Health Care. 2015;23 Suppl 2:S465-71. doi: 10.3233/THC-150983.

Studying frequency processing of the brain to enhance long-term memory and develop a human brain protocol.

Author information

1
School of Computing, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa.
2
The Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa.
3
Neurofeedback, Lynnwood, Pretoria, South Africa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The temporal lobe in conjunction with the hippocampus is responsible for memory processing. The gamma wave is involved with this process. To develop a human brain protocol, a better understanding of the relationship between gamma and long-term memory is vital.

OBJECTIVE:

A more comprehensive understanding of the human brain and specific analogue waves it uses will support the development of a human brain protocol.

METHODS:

Fifty-eight participants aged between 6 and 60 years participated in long-term memory experiments. It is envisaged that the brain could be stimulated through binaural beats (sound frequency) at 40 Hz (gamma) to enhance long-term memory capacity. EEG recordings have been transformed to sound and then to an information standard, namely ASCII.

RESULTS:

Statistical analysis showed a proportional relationship between long-term memory and gamma activity. Results from EEG recordings indicate a pattern. The pattern was obtained through the de-codification of an EEG recording to sound and then to ASCII.

CONCLUSIONS:

Stimulation of gamma should enhance long term memory capacity. More research is required to unlock the human brains' protocol key. This key will enable the processing of information directly to and from human memory via gamma, the hippocampus and the temporal lobe.

KEYWORDS:

Electroencephalography (EEG); brain protocol; hippocampus; long-term memory; signal processing

PMID:
26410513
DOI:
10.3233/THC-150983
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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