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BMC Plant Biol. 2015 Sep 26;15:231. doi: 10.1186/s12870-015-0607-1.

Diversity in boron toxicity tolerance of Australian barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genotypes.

Author information

1
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. julie.hayes@acpfg.com.au.
2
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. margaret.pallotta@acpfg.com.au.
3
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. melissa.garcia@acpfg.com.au.
4
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. tufan.oz@ufl.edu.
5
Present address: University of Florida Agronomy Department, Gainesville, Florida, USA. tufan.oz@ufl.edu.
6
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. jay.rongala@acpfg.com.au.
7
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics and The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Tim.Sutton@sa.gov.au.
8
Present address: South Australian Research and Development Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Tim.Sutton@sa.gov.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Boron (B) is an important micronutrient for plant growth, but is toxic when levels are too high. This commonly occurs in environments with alkaline soils and relatively low rainfall, including many of the cereal growing regions of southern Australia. Four major genetic loci controlling tolerance to high soil B have been identified in the landrace barley, Sahara 3771. Genes underlying two of the loci encode the B transporters HvBot1 and HvNIP2;1.

RESULTS:

We investigated sequence and expression level diversity in HvBot1 and HvNIP2;1 across barley germplasm, and identified five novel coding sequence alleles for HvBot1. Lines were identified containing either single or multiple copies of the Sahara HvBot1 allele. We established that only the tandemly duplicated Sahara allele conferred B tolerance, and this duplicated allele was found only in a set of nine lines accessioned in Australian collections as Sahara 3763-3771. HvNIP2;1 coding sequences were highly conserved across barley germplasm. We identified the likely causative SNP in the 5'UTR of Sahara HvNIP2;1, and propose that the creation of a small upstream open reading frame interferes with HvNIP2;1 translation in Sahara 3771. Similar to HvBot1, the tolerant HvNIP2;1 allele was unique to the Sahara barley accessions. We identified a new source of the 2H B tolerance allele controlling leaf symptom development, in the landrace Ethiopia 756.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ethiopia 756, as well as the cultivar Sloop Vic which carries both the 2H and HvBot1 B tolerance alleles derived from Sahara 3771, may be valuable as alternative parents in breeding programs targeted to high soil B environments. There is significant diversity in B toxicity tolerance among contemporary Australian barley varieties but this is not related to variation at any of the four known B tolerance loci, indicating that novel, as yet undiscovered, sources of tolerance exist.

PMID:
26410221
PMCID:
PMC4584011
DOI:
10.1186/s12870-015-0607-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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