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Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Oct 15;61Suppl 3:S217-24. doi: 10.1093/cid/civ615.

T-Cell Therapy: Options for Infectious Diseases.

Author information

1
Therapeutic Immunology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
2
Therapeutic Immunology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
3
Division of Clinical Infectious Diseases, German Center for Infection Research, Research Center Borstel.
4
Division of Clinical Infectious Diseases, German Center for Infection Research, Research Center Borstel International Health/Infectious Diseases, University of Lübeck, Germany Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
5
Therapeutic Immunology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
6
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
7
Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology.
8
Therapeutic Immunology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Department of Infection, Division of Infection and Immunity, Centre for Clinical Microbiology, University College London National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, University College London Hospitals, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis is challenging tuberculosis control worldwide. In the absence of an effective vaccine to prevent primary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease, host-directed therapies may offer therapeutic options, particularly for patients with multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis where prognosis is often limited. CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells mediate antigen-specific adaptive cellular immune responses. Their use in precision immunotherapy in clinical conditions, especially in treating cancer as well as for prevention of life-threatening viral infections in allogeneic transplant recipients, demonstrated safety and clinical efficacy. We review key achievements in T-cell therapy, including the use of recombinant immune recognition molecules (eg, T-cell receptors and CD19 chimeric antigen receptors), and discuss its potential in the clinical management of patients with drug-resistant and refractory tuberculosis failing conventional therapy.

KEYWORDS:

CAR; Mtb; T-cells; adoptive cell therapy; host-directed therapy

PMID:
26409284
PMCID:
PMC4583575
DOI:
10.1093/cid/civ615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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