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Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Oct 15;61Suppl 3:S102-18. doi: 10.1093/cid/civ609.

Perspectives on Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnostics, Drugs, and Vaccines.

Author information

1
Critical Path to TB Drug Regimens, Critical Path Institute, Tucson, Arizona.
2
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Fondazione S. Maugeri, Care and Research Institute, Tradate, Italy.
3
Department of Immunology and Infection, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
4
TB Alert, Brighton, United Kingdom.
5
University of Zambia-University College London Medical School Research and Training Project, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.
6
Kilimanjaro Clinical Research Institute, Moshi, Tanzania.
7
Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Northwick Park Hospital.
8
Department of Nuclear Imaging, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
9
Unitat de Tuberculosi Experimental, Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Ctra. de Can Ruti, Camí de les Escoles, Barcelona, Spain.
10
Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
11
Therapeutic Immunology, Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
12
Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London and National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Despite concerted efforts over the past 2 decades at developing new diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines with expanding pipelines, tuberculosis remains a global emergency. Several novel diagnostic technologies show promise of better point-of-care rapid tests for tuberculosis including nucleic acid-based amplification tests, imaging, and breath analysis of volatile organic compounds. Advances in new and repurposed drugs for use in multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis have focused on development of several new drug regimens and their evaluation in clinical trials and now influence World Health Organization guidelines. Since the failure of the MVA85A vaccine 2 years ago, there have been no new tuberculosis vaccine candidates entering clinical testing. The current status quo of the lengthy treatment duration and poor treatment outcomes associated with MDR/XDR tuberculosis and with comorbidity of tuberculosis with human immunodeficiency virus and noncommunicable diseases is unacceptable. New innovations and political and funder commitment for early rapid diagnosis, shortening duration of therapy, improving treatment outcomes, and prevention are urgently required.

KEYWORDS:

diagnostics; drugs; management; tuberculosis; vaccines

PMID:
26409271
PMCID:
PMC4583570
DOI:
10.1093/cid/civ609
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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