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PM R. 2016 May;8(5):445-52. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.09.012. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Feasibility of an Exoskeleton-Based Interactive Video Game System for Upper Extremity Burn Contractures.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, 300 First Ave, Boston, MA 02129(∗). Electronic address: jcschneider@partners.org.
2
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA(†).
3
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA(‡).
4
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA(§).
5
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA; and Università degli Studi di Sassari, Dipartimento di Scienze Politiche, Scienze della Comunicazione e Ingegneria, Sassari, Italy(¶).
6
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School; and Shriners Hospitals for Children, Boston, MA(#).
7
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA(‖).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Burn contractures are common and difficult to treat. Measuring continuous joint motion would inform the assessment of contracture interventions; however, it is not standard clinical practice. This study examines use of an interactive gaming system to measure continuous joint motion data.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the usability of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the rehabilitation of upper extremity burn contractures.

DESIGN:

Feasibility study.

SETTING:

Eight subjects with a history of burn injury and upper extremity contractures were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a regional inpatient rehabilitation facility.

METHODS:

Subjects used an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system to play 4 different video games. Continuous joint motion data were collected at the shoulder and elbow during game play.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Visual analog scale for engagement, difficulty and comfort. Angular range of motion by subject, joint, and game.

RESULTS:

The study population had an age of 43 ± 16 (mean ± standard deviation) years and total body surface area burned range of 10%-90%. Subjects reported satisfactory levels of enjoyment, comfort, and difficulty. Continuous joint motion data demonstrated variable characteristics by subject, plane of motion, and game.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates the feasibility of use of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the burn population. Future studies are needed that examine the efficacy of tailoring interactive video games to the specific joint impairments of burn survivors.

PMID:
26409198
DOI:
10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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