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Skeletal Radiol. 2016 Mar;45(3):401-5. doi: 10.1007/s00256-015-2263-9. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Combination acetabular radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty using a navigational radiofrequency ablation device and ultrahigh viscosity cement: technical note.

Author information

1
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Boulevard, Saint Louis, MO, 63110, USA. wallacea@mir.wustl.edu.
2
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Yawkey 6E, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
3
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Boulevard, Saint Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
4
Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Saint Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty is an alternative palliative therapy for painful metastases involving axial load-bearing bones. This technical report describes the use of a navigational radiofrequency probe to ablate acetabular metastases from an anterior approach followed by instillation of ultrahigh viscosity cement under CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The tumor ablation databases of two institutions were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who underwent combination acetabular radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty using the STAR Tumor Ablation and StabiliT Vertebral Augmentation Systems (DFINE; San Jose, CA). Pre-procedure acetabular tumor volume was measured on cross-sectional imaging. Pre- and post-procedure pain scores were measured using the Numeric Rating Scale (10-point scale) and compared. Partial pain improvement was categorically defined as ≥ 2-point pain score reduction. Patients were evaluated for evidence of immediate complications. Electronic medical records were reviewed for evidence of delayed complications.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 12 patients with acetabular metastases were treated. The median tumor volume was 54.3 mL (range, 28.3-109.8 mL). Pre- and post-procedure pain scores were obtained from 92% (11/12) of the cohort. The median pre-procedure pain score was 8 (range, 3-10). Post-procedure pain scores were obtained 7 days (82%; 9/11), 11 days (9.1%; 1/11) or 21 days (9.1%; 1/11) after treatment. The median post-treatment pain score was 3 (range, 1-8), a statistically significant difference compared with pre-treatment (P = 0.002). Categorically, 73% (8/11) of patients reported partial pain relief after treatment. No immediate symptomatic complications occurred. Three patients (25%; 3/12) were discharged to hospice within 1 week of treatment. No delayed complications occurred in the remaining 75% (9/12) of patients during median clinical follow-up of 62 days (range, 14-178 days).

CONCLUSIONS:

Palliative percutaneous acetabular radiofrequency ablation and cementoplasty can be feasibly performed from an anterior approach using a navigational ablation probe and ultrahigh viscosity cement instilled under CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

KEYWORDS:

Acetabulum; Cementoplasty; Metastatic bone disease; Radiofrequency ablation

PMID:
26408315
DOI:
10.1007/s00256-015-2263-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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