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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Apr;293(4):833-7. doi: 10.1007/s00404-015-3838-3. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Depression and anxiety in pregnant women with diabetes or mild hyperglycemia.

Author information

1
Postgraduate Program in Gynecology, Obstetrics and Mastology, Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (Unesp), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. noquessada@bol.com.br.
2
Municipal Authority of Botucatu, Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
Postgraduate Program in Gynecology, Obstetrics and Mastology, Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (Unesp), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
4
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (Unesp), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
5
Department of Nursing, Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (Unesp), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
6
Departamento de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, Hospital das Clínicas (HC), Av. Prof. Montenegro s/n, Distrito de Rubião Junior, Botucatu, São Paulo, CEP: 18.618-970, Brazil.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

A number of physical and psychological changes that occur during pregnancy can stimulate the development of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. The study evaluated psychological aspects related to maternal depression and anxiety in pregnant women with diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia, contrasting the results with those of non-diabetic pregnant women.

METHOD:

In a prospective and longitudinal approach, two questionnaires were applied and validated for use in Brazil, the Beck depression inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The questionnaires were applied to pregnant women at the first prenatal visit or at the time of disease diagnosis (T1) and reapplied at admission for delivery (T2). Regardless of the degree of hyperglycemia, both at first and in the second stage most women had severe anxiety trait. In early pregnancy (T1), however, severe state anxiety was more frequent in women with hyperglycemia than in those from the NG group.

RESULTS:

Most pregnant women showed moderate state anxiety over their pregnancy, regardless of glycemic status. In early pregnancy, however, severe state anxiety was more prevalent in hyperglycemic women than in those with normal glycemic status. Most women showed moderate trait anxiety and mild depression in both early and late pregnancy, irrespective of glycemic status.

CONCLUSION:

The incidence of severe state anxiety in early pregnancy is more frequent in women with diabetes or hyperglycemia, but their levels of trait anxiety and depression are not affected by glycemic status.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus; Hyperglycemia; Life quality; Pregnancy; Psychological aspects

PMID:
26408004
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-015-3838-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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