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J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2016 Apr;41(3):505-10. doi: 10.1007/s11239-015-1280-9.

Thrombelastography does not predict clinical response to rtPA for acute ischemic stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin St, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin St, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin St, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin St, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
5
Memorial Hermann Hospital, 6411 Fannin St, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. James.C.Grotta@uth.tmc.edu.

Abstract

Thrombelastography (TEG) measures coagulation in venous blood. We hypothesized that TEG, by reflecting clot subtype and ex vivo fibrinolysis, might predict fibrinolytic response to tPA as reflected by rapid clinical improvement or hemorrhagic transformation of the infarct. 171 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with tPA were prospectively enrolled. Venous blood for TEG was drawn before and 10 min after tPA bolus. We measured rapid clinical improvement (RCI = 8 point improvement on NIHSS or total NIHSS of 0, 1 at 36 h), Hemorrhagic transformation (HT = any blood on imaging within 36 h), and hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HDMCA = biomarker for erythrocyte-rich clot). Multivariable regression models compared TEG parameters after adjusting for potential confounders. No differences in pre- or post-tPA TEG were found between patients with or without RCI. Also, there was no correlation between TEG and HDMCA. Clotting was slightly prolonged in patients with HT (p = 0.046). We failed to find a robust association between TEG and clinical response to tPA. It is likely that arterial clot lysis is determined by factors unrelated to coagulation status as measured by TEG in the venous circulation. It is unlikely that TEG will be useful to predict clinical response to tPA, but may help predict bleeding.

KEYWORDS:

Haemocoagulation; Stroke; Thromboelastography; Thrombolysis; Thrombus

PMID:
26407682
DOI:
10.1007/s11239-015-1280-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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