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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Apr;293(4):731-8. doi: 10.1007/s00404-015-3899-3. Epub 2015 Sep 24.

Cord blood vitamin D status and neonatal outcomes in a birth cohort in Quebec, Canada.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Centre for Clinical Research, Dalhousie University, 5790 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 1V7, Canada.
2
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, 5980 University Avenue, PO Box 9700, Halifax, NS, B3K 6R8, Canada.
3
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, MS2042a Macdonald Stewart Bldg, 21111 Lakeshore Rd, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, H9X 3V9, Canada.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, 5980 University Avenue, PO Box 9700, Halifax, NS, B3K 6R8, Canada.
5
Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Centre, Université Laval, 10, rue de l'Espinay, Quebec, QC, G1L 3L5, Canada.
6
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, 5980 University Avenue, PO Box 9700, Halifax, NS, B3K 6R8, Canada. christy.woolcott@dal.ca.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Some evidence suggests that low maternal vitamin D status adversely affects perinatal health but few studies have examined cord blood vitamin D status. This project aimed to determine the association between the cord blood concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and neonatal outcomes.

METHODS:

A nested case-control study was conducted in Quebec City, Canada from 2005 to 2010. Included were 83 cases of low birthweight (LBW; <2500 g), 301 cases of small for gestational age (SGA; <10th percentile), 223 cases of preterm birth (PTB; <37 weeks' gestation), and 1027 controls. Levels of 25(OH)D were determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated with logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Cord blood [25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L was associated with a lower risk of LBW compared to [25(OH)D] ≥75 nmol/L (OR 0.47 95 % CI 0.23-0.97). For 25(OH)D levels 50-75 nmol/L, a significant association was not demonstrated (OR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.34-1.01). No significant associations were observed between [25(OH)D] and either SGA or PTB after adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although our findings suggest that [25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L is associated with reduced risk of having a LBW infant, prenatal vitamin D recommendations require an examination of the literature that considers the full spectrum of maternal and neonatal outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

25-Hydroxyvitamin D; Low birth weight; Nested case–control study; Preterm birth; Small for gestational age

PMID:
26404451
PMCID:
PMC5023425
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-015-3899-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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