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Regen Med. 2016 Jan;11(1):45-61. doi: 10.2217/rme.15.70. Epub 2015 Sep 23.

Intestinal stem cell growth and differentiation on a tubular scaffold with evaluation in small and large animals.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, 4401 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15217, USA.
2
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.
3
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, 450 Technology Drive Suite 300, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA.
4
Department of Biological & Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate the growth and differentiation of intestinal stem cells on a novel tubular scaffold in vitro and in vivo.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Intestinal progenitor cells from mice or humans were cultured with myofibroblasts, macrophages and/or bacteria, and evaluated in mice via omental implantation. Mucosal regeneration was evaluated in dogs after rectal mucosectomy followed by scaffold implantation.

RESULTS:

Intestinal progenitor cells differentiated into crypt-villi structures on the scaffold. Differentiation and scaffold coverage was enhanced by coculture with myofibroblasts, macrophages and probiotic bacteria, while the implanted scaffolds enhanced mucosal regeneration in the dog rectum.

CONCLUSION:

Intestinal stem cell growth and differentiation on a novel tubular scaffold is enhanced through addition of cellular and microbial components, as validated in mice and dogs.

KEYWORDS:

artificial intestine; intestinal stem cells; necrotizing enterocolitis; scaffold; short bowel syndrome; tissue-engineered small intestine

Comment in

PMID:
26395928
PMCID:
PMC4891976
DOI:
10.2217/rme.15.70
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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