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Vet Res. 2015 Sep 23;46:99. doi: 10.1186/s13567-015-0232-x.

A broad spectrum screening of Schmallenberg virus antibodies in wildlife animals in Germany.

Author information

1
Junior Research Group Wildlife Diseases, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Südufer 10, 17493, Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany. susan.mouchantat@fli.bund.de.
2
Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Südufer 10, 17493, Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany. kerstin.wernike@fli.bund.de.
3
Institute of Wildlife Research, Pützchens Chaussee 228, 53229, Bonn, Germany. walburga.lutz@lanuv.nrw.de.
4
Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Südufer 10, 17493, Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany. bernd.hoffmann@fli.bund.de.
5
Institute for Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Südufer 10, 17493, Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany. rainer.ulrich@fli.bund.de.
6
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW), Alfred-Kowalke-Str. 17, 10315, Berlin, Germany. konstantin-b@web.de.
7
State Laboratory Berlin-Brandenburg (LLBB), Invalidenstr. 60, 10557, Berlin, Germany. ulrich.wittstatt@landeslabor-bbb.de.
8
Institute of Diagnostic Virology, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Südufer 10, 17493, Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany. martin.beer@fli.bund.de.

Abstract

To identify native wildlife species possibly susceptible to infection with Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a midge-transmitted orthobunyavirus that predominantly infects domestic ruminants, samples from various free-living ruminants, but also carnivores, small mammals and wild boar were analyzed serologically. Before 2011, no SBV-specific antibodies were detectable in any of the tested species, thereafter, a large proportion of the ruminant population became seropositive, while every sample taken from carnivores or small mammals tested negative. Surprisingly, SBV-specific-antibodies were also present in a large number of blood samples from wild boar during the 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 hunting seasons. Hence, free-ranging artiodactyls may play a role as wildlife host.

PMID:
26394618
PMCID:
PMC4579581
DOI:
10.1186/s13567-015-0232-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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