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PLoS One. 2015 Sep 21;10(9):e0135706. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0135706. eCollection 2015.

Acceptability of Male Circumcision among College Students in Medical Universities in Western China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Author information

1
Guangxi Key Laboratory of AIDS Prevention and Treatment, School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 530021, China.
2
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, 30310, United States of America.
3
The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.
4
School of Public Health, Xinjiang Medical University, Xinjiang, 830011, China.
5
School of Public Health, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.
6
National Center for STD Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, 210042, China.
7
State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control (SKLID), Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Beijing, 102206, China.
8
Guangxi Key Laboratory of AIDS Prevention and Treatment, School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 530021, China; Guangxi Medical Research Center, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 530021, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Male circumcision (MC) has been shown to reduce the risk of female to male transmission of HIV. The goal of this survey was to explore MC's acceptability and the factors associated with MC among college students in medical universities in western China.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was carried out in three provinces in western China (Guangxi, Chongqing and Xinjiang) to assess the acceptability of MC as well as to discover factors associated with the acceptability among college students in medical universities. A total of 1,790 uncircumcised male students from three medical universities were enrolled in this study. In addition, 150 students who had undergone MC were also enrolled in the survey, and they participated in in-depth interviews.

RESULTS:

Of all the uncircumcised participants (n = 1,790), 55.2% (n = 988) were willing to accept MC. Among those who accepted MC, 67.3% thought that MC could improve their sexual partners' hygiene, 46.3% believed that HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) could be partially prevented by MC. The multivariable logistic regression indicates that MC's acceptability was associated with three factors: the redundant foreskin (OR = 10.171, 95% CI = 7.629-13.559), knowing the hazard of having a redundant foreskin (OR = 1.597, 95% CI = 1.097-2.323), and enhancing sexual pleasure (OR = 1.628, 95% CI = 1.312-2.021). The in-depth interviews for subjects who had undergone MC showed that the major reason for having MC was the redundant foreskin (87.3%), followed by the benefits and the fewer complications of having MC done. In addition, most of these participants (65.3%) said that the MC could enhance sexual satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS:

MC's acceptance among college students in medical universities is higher than it is among other populations in western China. An implementation of an MC programme among this population is feasible in the future.

PMID:
26390212
PMCID:
PMC4577094
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0135706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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