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Neuroscience. 2015 Dec 3;310:198-205. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.09.037. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

Contrast adaptation is spatial frequency specific in mouse primary visual cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
2
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: nathan.crowder@dal.ca.

Abstract

Contrast adaptation, generated by prolonged viewing of a high contrast spatial pattern, is known to reduce perceptual sensitivity to subsequently presented stimuli of similar spatial frequency (SF). Neural correlates of this pattern-specific contrast adaptation have been described in several classic studies in cat primary visual cortex (V1). These results have also recently been extended to mice, which is a genetically manipulable animal model. Here we attempt to parse the potential mechanisms contributing to this phenomenon by determining whether the SF specificity of contrast adaptation observed in mouse V1 neurons depends on the spike rate elicited by the adapting gratings. We found that adapting stimuli that drove a neuron more strongly generally produced more adaptation, implicating an intrinsic or fatigue-like process. Importantly, we also observed that slightly stronger contrast adaptation was produced when the adapting SF matched the test SF even when matched and nonmatched adapting gratings elicited similar spike rates indicating extrinsic or network processes contribute as well.

KEYWORDS:

animal model; contrast adaptation; electrophysiology; sinusoidal gratings; spatial frequency; vision

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