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Genes Dev. 2015 Sep 15;29(18):1969-79. doi: 10.1101/gad.266056.115.

REC-1 and HIM-5 distribute meiotic crossovers and function redundantly in meiotic double-strand break formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada;
2
DNA Damage Response Laboratory, The Francis Crick Institute, South Mimms EN3 3LD, United Kingdom; Clare Hall Laboratories, The Francis Crick Institute, South Mimms EN3 3LD, United Kingdom;
3
Magee-Womens Research Institute, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA;
4
Medical Research Council Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The Caenorhabditis elegans gene rec-1 was the first genetic locus identified in metazoa to affect the distribution of meiotic crossovers along the chromosome. We report that rec-1 encodes a distant paralog of HIM-5, which was discovered by whole-genome sequencing and confirmed by multiple genome-edited alleles. REC-1 is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) in vitro, and mutation of the CDK consensus sites in REC-1 compromises meiotic crossover distribution in vivo. Unexpectedly, rec-1; him-5 double mutants are synthetic-lethal due to a defect in meiotic double-strand break formation. Thus, we uncovered an unexpected robustness to meiotic DSB formation and crossover positioning that is executed by HIM-5 and REC-1 and regulated by phosphorylation.

KEYWORDS:

HIM-5; REC-1; cyclin-dependent kinase; meiosis; meiotic crossover distribution

PMID:
26385965
PMCID:
PMC4579353
DOI:
10.1101/gad.266056.115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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